ELEVEN YEARS later… (health update)

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ELEVEN YEARS later I finally get the MRI of my damaged hip. Two months after the MRI I got my results – photographs above and below of them. So to all those people – including some family, neighbours, ‘doctors’, Blue Badge A-holes and sadistic types working for the government who stop ill people’s welfare money this is your proof. Of course I knew it – was something significant – all along. Only the doctors didn’t believe me.

10 months of ‘walking’ around with a partially dislocated hip. No X-rays, no MRIs at the very beginning that would have saved me from chronic pain and physical disability. Evolving into a ‘double injury’ – first, the initial physical trauma and then, second, the soft tissues and nerves becoming more damaged through the neglect of the appropriate treatment.

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They robbed me of 11 years of my life – I don’t know if after being seen and treated by the orthopaedic clinic will better my situation? Lesson the pain, repair the damage, stop me being crippled? Enable me to study and work and lead a richer life? I very much hope so. (I cannot say they will because after how I’ve been poorly treated, that much faith in our healthcare system which I’d had, is now killed).

I was so hard on myself. Because they told me I’d be walking again. Properly walking not this zombie gait that, like a clockwork toy gets slower and slower until I can’t move. I kept telling them about the intense pain and they didn’t acknowledge it – one doctor likened my pain to a scalpel-cut on his thumb; one doctor told me my hip pain wasn’t hip pain because it was in the wrong place; the council refused to renew my Blue Badge because my pain wasn’t severe enough; twice the pain clinic with different specialists refused me the better and appropriate pain meds…

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I made myself go through a 3-month long business school course, got myself a Jack Russell terrier to walk, made business plans with my fiance and we bought a fast food burger van, and I took a hygiene certificate course – all this during the time of the dislocated hip; before a private physiotherapist (orthopaedic) correctly diagnosed and reduced or put my hip back into place. Ever since, over the years, my hip has been repeatedly dislocating. Then, the three attempts at higher education. I failed at beginning the business by myself when my fiance had to return to Canada (to await his Greek passport to be able to live and work as a member of the EU in the UK; those Greeks took SIX YEARS getting his paperwork in order) and I failed at further education only because of the severe pain. Whereas I’d often worked for myself before and had completed other courses.

Although I have undesired red marrow and a labral tear I am greatly relieved NOT to have dying bones. That’s very scary. I don’t have avascular necrosis.

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I saw the nicest doctor yesterday who patiently explained what he was able to with his GP training. I haven’t seen him before, I think he’s an Indian gentleman. He was annoyed at the other GPs not saying they needed an up-to-date blood test from me and for giving me the wrong advice regarding my asthma inhaler. He listened to me. He didn’t get angry when I mentioned meeting two other people on the internet with similar hip problems and the discussions we’d had. He said my thyroid needs looking into when I told him I was treated for hypothyroidism in Germany and that my mum has it. I said I’d been refused thyroxine here and I look like I eat cakes all day (I really don’t πŸ˜‰ ). He gave me some ‘homework’, in his words, lol, to look up on the internet – myxoedema. And that I can call him to discuss anything I don’t understand in my MRI results. I booked a blood test for next week and got a prescription for three inhalers, including a new ‘pink’ one but when we got home we realised the dispensary service at the doctors forgot my ‘brown’ (long-term) one!

The Dr asked me whether I wanted a referral to the orthopaedic clinic – I said yes, I would – and he wrote them an email in front of me. He had most of it written already before I entered the consulting room. It is likely I will be having surgery in the spring or summer. I am both dreading and eagerly anticipating it. I hope John will take good care of my dogs. He said last night he’d get buses for the long journey (1 hr journey one-way) every day to see me. I said maybe he could smuggle in one of the dogs… πŸ˜‰

The Dr said we’d investigate my breathing difficulties with the respiratory clinic later. Apparently, there are several tests. Maybe by then, as well as having a newly repaired hip I’ll also have my thyroxine?

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~ Wishing everyone a HAPPY 2019!!! ~

Happy New Year 2019 greeting card

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Copyright Faith McCord 2018

Story and artwork belongs to Faith McCord who is the author and artist holding the copyright. This is not a public domain work. Worldwide rights.

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About Oscar Dandelion

Hi, I'm Faith McCord, writer of the Oscar Dandelion books. I love reading, writing, watching films, looking at architecture and general design, embroidery (especially Elizabethan), spending time with my family. I used to enjoy long walks, bodybuilding, going out, however, since my injury my mobility is seriously impaired, so I'm more of a home-body now. I'm interested in meeting other indie / pro writers, so do say 'Hello' ! :)
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14 Responses to ELEVEN YEARS later… (health update)

  1. nanacathy2 says:

    Oh my. The very very best of luck or 2019.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. So good you finally found a GP who listens! I hope your health improves in 2019!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. So many things to take in there. Did you notice the AVM mentioned? A new hip? That is probably about time! Good luck. Can John not drive the fur-kids up to visit you? (Collecting parcel tomorrow. Can’t wait!)Cheers,H

    Liked by 1 person

    • I think it’s too much to take in without a brain injury lol.
      Well, the bones are good which is great. I think they’ll be repairing the labral tear somehow. I hear there’s new, less intrusive procedures now…
      John doesn’t drive over here. UK and European roads are narrow and he’s nervous about accidents. We couldn’t afford to lose our car πŸ˜‰ He’ll be taking the bus.
      If I’m able to get outside the hospital I think that’d be an excellent idea, him bringing a dog or two.
      πŸ™‚ xo

      Like

  4. Pingback: Help fund my needed breast reduction | Little Lord Oscar Dandelion Books

  5. Wendy says:

    It doesn’t seem I can donate on Go Fund Me with $ instead of pounds. Do you know of a way?
    I think I can do it via Pay Pal. Not sure, but it seems I just bought something and it went through there. Give me a shout. you can reach me by going to my blog and hitting the About/Contact Me tap at the top. I’m happy to help a bit, wish I could do more.
    xoxo

    Like

  6. simplywendi says:

    Faith, it is just beyond inhumane. to walk around 11 YEARS, let alone 11 months, is just awful. I am deeply sorry you have had to endure this pain.

    Like

  7. Undine says:

    I had hip pain in both hips, so I get it with hip pain. Had labral tears in both hips and arthroscopic surgery for both, 7 months apart. The recovery took a long time but it went well. Last year I broke my whole darn hip then, so trust me, I get it with hip pain.

    I wish you the best of luck with your hip. I know how much hip pain can suck.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Evangelina, I am sorry to hear of your own hip pain – and in both hips! – it’s truly amazing we get anything done. I hope you are doing much better now, pain and mobility wise.

      Do you take any supplements? I can share you mine if you’re interested πŸ™‚

      Sorry for the late reply, I don’t often post on my blog.

      ((hugs)) xo

      Like

  8. Edward Fagan says:

    I sincerely share the pain and sorrow you’ve experienced through out this long ordeal. And I hope that you’ll soon see an improvement in your state of health and level of mobility.

    Liked by 1 person

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