Garden + patio plants (photos)

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12th June 2020

Photos I took of a fruit tree, Foxglove and garden/patio plants. Ought to be placed between the photos of the 2nd and 20th June 2020. Whoops!

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Foxgloves

The foxglove bells, with lolling tongue,
Will not reveal what peals were rung
In Faery, in Faery,
A thousand ages gone.
All the golden clappers hang
As if but now the changes rang;
Only from the mottled throat
Never any echoes float.
Quite forgotten, in the wood,
Pale, crowded steeples rise;
All the time that they have stood
None has heard their melodies.
Deep, deep in wizardry
All the foxglove belfries stand.
Should they startle over the land,
None would know what bells they be.
Never any wind can ring them,
Nor the great black bees that swing them–
Every crimson bell, down-slanted,
Is so utterly enchanted.
– by Mary Webb

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Above photo: Foxglove. I sowed some foxglove seeds last year and apparently I have three of them in the long grass of the neglected flower/veg bed. They are a native flower of Britain and a favourite of ‘Cottage Gardens’. They’re featured heavily in Art Deco patterns on plates, cups, and embroidered table-cloths.

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“Foxgloves are an important source of pollen for bees. The species has evolved to be especially attractive to long-tongued bees such as the common carder bee. The brightly coloured flowers and dark spotted lip attracts the bee, while the lower lip of the flower allows the insect to land before climbing up the tube. In doing so, the bee will drop pollen from other foxgloves, allowing the plant to reproduce.” – Woodlandtrust.org.uk

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Above photo: a plenitude of golden buttercups! I sowed these seeds some time ago. I was missing this wildflower and the bees love it too.

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Above photo: the plum tree. I usually call it the apple tree – we have apples, pears and plums – but I think it’s the plum tree šŸ˜‰Ā  Look at the fruit emerging – still green, hard and completely inedible.

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Above photo: My beloved Granddad’s summerhouse peeking out from under the boughs of trees. When he passed on his summerhouse came here.

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Above photo: ferns from the nearby sand dunes seeded themselves here. Apparently the Victorians loved ferns so much they pillaged them from the British countryside. The loss of ferns – where they were abundantly growing – is even more significant today. I think they’re beautiful. I water them along with my other plants.

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Above photo: the blueberries before that one turned pink!

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Above photo: the tea rose, just buds and leaves…

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Above photo: the washing-line-clematis before it bloomed!

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Above photo: the tall, ragged daisies before they flowered.

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Reference links

Foxglove

Mary Webb

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Copyright Faith McCord 2020

Story and artwork belongs to Faith McCord who is the author and artist holding the copyright. This is not a public domain work. Worldwide rights.

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About Oscar Dandelion

Hi, I'm Faith McCord, writer of the Oscar Dandelion books. I love reading, writing, watching films, looking at architecture and general design, embroidery (especially Elizabethan), spending time with my family. I used to enjoy long walks, bodybuilding, going out, however, since my injury my mobility is seriously impaired, so I'm more of a home-body now. I'm interested in meeting other indie / pro writers, so do say 'Hello' ! :)
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9 Responses to Garden + patio plants (photos)

  1. I was really happy when buttercups arrived in my garden two years ago. I have a lot this year and I am going to sow the seeds in the front of the house.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I was so sorry to read about your beloved Nutmeg. My condolences.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Beautiful, and that is so nice that you have something from your grandfathers for your garden. What a pretty garden. I am also sorry to hear about your pet. Nutmeg sounds like such a sweet little creature. So cute that she came to the cage to greet you. Our little pets are like family to us, at least this is how I feel.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you dear friend.

      When I move from here I don’t think it will withstand moving though. I would like to take it with me when I have to move (when my Mum goes) as it was Granddad’s. He only had a little yard in which he grew flowers and vegetables. He began growing veg during the 2nd World War. He passed away too soon, he was a sprightly 86-year old in the mid-80s! He died a few days later after a motorcycle hit him while he was crossing the road.

      Thank you for your condolences. I couldn’t stop crying yesterday as well. Today I’m sad and exhausted from having to take Chester to the vet to see about her lump. I’m getting financial help to get it removed (haven’t been able to work since the injury 12 years ago). Any standing or even a little walking (when I’m able to walk) takes a huge toll on my body). I’ll reply to you soon (thanks for your thoughtful reply).

      Pets never let you down. Although I do care about some people šŸ™‚

      All the best to you and your beautiful family xox

      Like

  4. aeidola says:

    hey, hope you’ve been well. dunno if you remember me, but i had to start a new blog since i lost access to the old one (withlovedotio.wordpress.com). we even communicated via e-mail at one point (mdaniels0101@gmail.com) back in August 2016. time flies… be well! šŸ˜Š

    Liked by 1 person

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